A Day in the Life of Luis: COVID and living with a disability

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Rebecca Aguila

"A Day in the Life of Luis" is a weekly personal column written by Luis Lemus.

Luis Lemus

Life as a disabled person is tough enough as it is.

Throw a life-threatening pandemic on top and it definitely changes the daily routine in the worst way possible.

Thrown in the fact that family members unfortunately passed away due to the pandemic, it only heightens the feeling of responsibility for your well-being.

As a person with a compromised immune system due to the multiple sclerosis, I do have myself in a sort of “self-induced lockdown” as keeping the door closed and the windows shut as well.

Working on walking around with the bars installed are probably within reach if the window was open but you are not foolish enough for that.

Family is sacrificing lots of things they could do but choose not to go to me having the autoimmune disease to worry about back at home.

Trying not to let it fester in the head too much helps, choosing to instead watch favorite older cartoons or perhaps “Netflix and quarantine.“

Perhaps even watch two hip-hop producers “battle” it out on Sundays or something like last Saturday night which is attend a “rave” on YouTube with about 107 thousand others from the relative safety of one’s own home either dancing the night away from the mundane repetitive news or doing it all on the bed.

Either way you are doing differently than what was perceived as normal all of perhaps six weeks ago.

What do the freeways look like without many cars out there? That’s an honest question.

Knowing that this will one day be in the history class lectures, a soon-to-be born child might ask for knowledge of “The Great Pandemic of 2020.”

What do you say to them?

“I made it out relatively safe but beyond that I really couldn’t tell you about much else. Maybe you should ask someone else to get a better idea.”

Knowing that they weren’t doing any kind of activity all in the hope of to keep the one with the compromised immune system as healthy as possible makes one feel appreciated in them doing their own daily sacrifices, in the hope that another person is safe from what is out there.

Sure, the feeling of frustration can get to a person but knowing that it is for the best interest is definitely appreciated.

Having that type of a support system definitely helps, even if in the moment there might be some disagreement.

Not being able to show the appreciation sucks but giving them the simple words of “thank you“ after what needed to be done goes a long way.

In all, this is simply a roundabout way to express my many thanks for the assistance.

It goes beyond any words can express.

All of us are safe here at home and what more does one want to be able to say when this passes?