“Two and a Half Men” might as well be “Welcome Back Kelso”

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Pete Moye'

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Victor Diaz and Victor Diaz

Pete Moye’
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Dear “Two and a Half Men:”

What the hell happened?

It’s obvious that removing Charlie Sheen was a necessary thing to do, due to his drug-filled tirades toward creator Chuck Lorre and referring to Jon Cryer as a “troll,” but the question is, did you have to go in the direction that you did?

Ever since the announcement that Ashton Kutcher would serve as Sheen’s replacement, longtime fans such as myself viewed the decision with skepticism.

Once the new season premiered on Sept. 19, that skepticism was perfectly justified.

The debut of Walden Schmidt, Kutcher’s character, could simply be described as the reincarnation of Michael Kelso, the bumbling, moronic “That ‘70s Show” character that elevated Kutcher to his current state of stardom.

Kutcher delivered nothing new for viewers; it felt as if viewers took a time machine to Point Place, Wisc. and fast-forwarded it 40 years into the future.

Any minute, I was expecting Eric, Hyde, Jackie, Donna and even Fez, to walk through the door of the Harper household.

Also, despite the issues Sheen had before leaving the show, he has recently come out and apologized for his actions as well as wishing the cast the best of luck. This could have very well been an opening to bring Charlie Harper back into the fold in the near future.

But no, you just had to kill him off.

He was killed on a train? Are you kidding me? The backstory behind his death was absolutely flawed and it was obvious that was something that was thrown in there at the last minute.

And are we just supposed to believe that Schmidt just so happened to like the Harper house so much, he’s just going to buy it with the billions of dollars he just popped up out of nowhere and Alan, Jake and Berta just live happily ever after?

In short, the new phase of the show is a disastrous one. Sure, you got ratings resembling “American Idol,” but that’s only due to the large level of interest and intrigue from the viewers.

However, once they wise up and realize the mediocrity of the show, you’ll be looking to employ the services of one man, but you won’t be able to because he’ll be too busy “winning.”

Sincerely,

A former fan of the show.