Talon Marks

Philosophy club presentation discusses creation care and the environment

Andrew Rehfeld discussing the components of the Wesleyan Quadrilateral in order to illustrate the four different aspects that are considered before reaching a conclusion theologically. Photo credit: Bianca Martinez

TM Bianca Martinez

Andrew Rehfeld discussing the components of the Wesleyan Quadrilateral in order to illustrate the four different aspects that are considered before reaching a conclusion theologically. Photo credit: Bianca Martinez

Bianca Martinez

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Marine Biology major Adolfo Valdez sat in a state of befuddlement as Philosophy Professor Andrew Rehfeld explained the concept of Creation Care during a Philosophy Club meeting in SS137 on Tuesday, Oct. 25.

Students and a few faculty members attended the meeting in order to acknowledge the main theme being discussed during the meeting, Religion and Ethics.

However, the main subject of discussion was Creation Care.

Rehfeld defines the concept by stating “Creation Care is an environmental movement among some Evangelicals to teach others within the community about the scriptural and theological reasons to care for Creation.”

Valdez stated the reason for his befuddlement is the recent Evangelical involvement in order to preserve the environment and its resources.

Valdez explained “It took all these decades for these individuals to take part in something they should have been doing before these decades passed. As a species through time we evolve, the individual, his process of thinking is stopped due to the problem of religion because they become conformists to the belief that there is a deity that is in control of everything, when in reality, we are in charge.”

During the meeting, Rehfeld discussed the factors that have contributed to Evangelists not acting sooner in regard to environmental preservation.

These factors being dualism, “God’s plan”, and Hierarchy of Importance

Rehfeld acknowledged that religion has been immature and ignorant at times in consideration to certain matters pertaining to science, “I’d say that science cleans out pseudo religious traditions…Pseudo-religious traditions are immature sciences and modern sciences definitely displace them.”

Despite Valdez’s clearly derisive standpoint in regard to religious ideals, he commended Rehfeld on his execution of the presentation.

Valdez stated, “He was honest, he literally explained without illiteracy of the subject. He even put himself as an example to make the listener and viewer understand about Evangelism. He made the individual understood the pros and cons of religion in society.”

Rehfeld ensured that any questions or concerns that arose during the meeting were addressed and answered.

However, majority of the audience absorbed the discussion silently while a small portion of attendees interacted and voiced their opinion and provided an input on the matter of religion.

Religion and Ethics being one of the many topics that be discussed in upcoming Philosophy Club meetings that occur every Tuesday.

As Professor Rehfeld quoted, “‘Philosophy is the handmaiden of theology.'”

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Cerritos College • Norwalk, Calif.
Philosophy club presentation discusses creation care and the environment