Bianca Bitches: festival fun for all

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Coachella season is finally upon us, April 12 marks the start of the onslaught of “basic bitch” Instagram posts featuring thin women in their best festival looks.

But why should festival fashion only be designated and designed for those that society has deemed aesthetically and essentially sexually pleasing?

Take a memo, festival fashion designers, the majority of festival goers are not 115 pounds and female.

Designers and clothing lines that cater to festival goers must cater to all festival goers and should make clothing to accommodate all sizes and genders.

How are we all not collectively crying bullshit because there aren’t a vast variety of outfits that celebrate plus size outfits amongst the sea of skinny-girl-friendly ensembles?

Sure, clothing brand Dollskill, who are notorious for their festival gear, have a plus size line, but the smaller sizes are always considerably cuter than the plus sizes.

While we are on the topic of size diversity, let’s move onto gender diversity, shall we?

When did we decide that men don’t deserve pretty, holographic clothes because of society’s notion of what men should dress and look like?

If a man wants to see Ariana Grande in a mesh mini-dress with nothing but a sequined thong underneath, that’s his prerogative.

Last time I checked, people attend music festivals to watch the headliners, not scrutinize people for their weight or gender.

We should all acknowledge how absurd it is to not allow a woman the right to wear whatever she wants, especially if she is plus sized, specifically because society doesn’t deem her bangable.

Society prefers another person to suffer from heatstroke rather than dressing appropriately for the environment they are in.

As ridiculous as this sounds, people dying of heatstroke, the majority of us don’t even bat an eye, because we are too busy adhering to society’s bullshit standards.

You know what’s also asinine?

Not stepping in or saying something when someone is being harassed or bullied for their sexuality and gender identity.

This intolerance is another reason as to why some festival goers hesitate when picking out their festival outfits.

It really isn’t that hard to be an ally and cooperate in creating a safe space for others, especially in a large, crowded setting such as Coachella, so make the effort.

Let people know they can rely on you to back them up if shit goes down, no matter their size or identity.

Festivals should be a fun environment for people to be comfortable and enjoy themselves.

So if you see a plus size girl in what you believe to be an outfit “too revealing for their size,” swallow the load of horseshit that you were about to spew out at her and live your life, just like she is living her’s.

The same principle goes for men in “feminine” clothing, leave that man in the dress alone!

It’s hot out, it’s going to be even hotter in a crowd, let that man air his huevos in peace.

Speaking heat, say something when you see another person being sexually harassed.

What counts as sexual harassment, you may ask?

Catcalling. Yes, catcalling not to be confused with a compliment because there is a big-ass difference between “your blouse is nice” versus “LET ME SEE THEM TITTIES.”

Groping, hands-down, is sexual harassment, including brushing past and/or tapping a person’s genitalia, butt and/or breasts.

Remarking on a person’s physical appearance is also harassment, not a compliment. Too bad, perverts.

Soliciting or propositioning another person for sex is, you guessed it, sexual harassment.

So have fun, stay safe and wear what you want with confidence and may all others who disagree, fuck off!

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