Dragon Ball Super: Broly is a Super Saiyan Success

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Back to Article

Dragon Ball Super: Broly is a Super Saiyan Success

10044778

10044778

TM Vandal Viaoeste

10044778

TM Vandal Viaoeste

TM Vandal Viaoeste

10044778

Edgar Mendoza, Staff Writer

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Written by Akira Toriyama and directed by Tatsuya Nagamine, Dragon Ball Super: Broly serves a wonderfully action-packed return to a franchise loved by many.

The Film centers around three survivors of an alien race. These Saiyans have their fates intertwined by the destruction of their planet, adding an emotional aspect that balances well with fast-paced thrills.

It is this balance that allows the film to shine as true to its roots, embodying what fans have grown to love over the years.

Rewriting the origins of beloved characters such as the lighthearted Goku, the stubborn Prince Vegeta, and the gentle-hearted beserker Broly, the film is able to serve as a joyride for longtime fans and an introduction for newcomers.

The film presents itself as a classic beat-em-up but is, in fact, a tale of dualities, parallels between good and evil and the impact that a father figure can have on who you become.

Fueled by phenomenal voice acting and a brand new animation style, the film is able to add an emotional aspect that was previously unexplored in the series focused on fighting, that of being reluctant to fight at all.

The film also explores interesting social issues by way of comedy and the occasional snide remark.

Broly, for instance, is trained to be a brute warrior by his father despite his wishes, mirroring an academic struggle many children live with on a daily basis, that is, wanting to have a childhood but being forced to study at all waking hours.

Goku, on the other hand, is sent away by his father Bardock in an attempt to protect his child from the brutal ways of his people.

These small character developments serve as an effective means to get the audience to care for the characters, increasing the conflict within them as to who to root for.

Visually the film is a treat, packed with vibrant colors and the distinct transformations that allow viewers to tell characters apart as well as melding CGI and hand-drawn animations in a way that all flows together.

The rapidly paced brawls are easy to follow, though bizarre in some stages.

The addition of series mainstay villain Frieza helps serves as a catalyst for the chain of events that bring Broly to earth, keeping the plot from ever seeming slow or pointless.

Unlike in previous villains throughout the series, Broly serves not simply as another foe to vanquish and move on from, but as a compelling and fresh character that fans may find themselves doubting if they want to see defeated.

The heroes remain as iconic as ever, with many callbacks to previous entries in the series scattered throughout.

Though the plot is simple, small branches from the main path are embraced, opening the way for future installments in the franchise.

There are however a few minor gripes in this installment, rather than sticking to the pre-established battle cries and signature movies, Toriyama instead opted to skip the declarations in favor of a divine voice from the heavens announcing them.

This change is minor, but for longtime fans can be surprising and take away slightly from the overall experience.

Overall the film is a great return to the franchise, using humor, action and human emotions to bring fans back to their childhood, or to introduce newcomers to world of limitless imagination and breathtaking brawls.

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