Clubs compete for glory and companionship

clubs+compete+in+the+physical+portion+of+the+Falcon+Games.+Tuesday+March+25.+Photo+credit%3A+Carlos+Holguin

clubs compete in the physical portion of the Falcon Games. Tuesday March 25. Photo credit: Carlos Holguin

Carlos Holguin

Club members were literally jumping through hoops and climbing up walls to compete against one another in the annual Falcon Games.

Held on the field behind the gymnasium on Tuesday, March 25, a total of 21 clubs participated in the event according to Suleyma Castillo, Commissioner of Interclub Council.

Clubs competed for the top-three positions, with Architecture club coming in first place taking $300 for their club.

“The Falcon Games were initiated by the commissioner of Interclub Council three years ago, so this is something unique to our campus,” Castillo said. “It is kind of amazing for our campus to have something like this for student life and engagement.”

The games started with students sliding on lunch trays, balancing eggs on a spoon and hula-hooping their way from one marker to another.

Only a select number of clubs made it through to the next round, culminating to only two clubs competing in a timed maze and obstacle course run.

Ishmael Albert, civil engineering major, was playing for the Kabarkada Club who made it into the semi-finals before losing in the lunch-tray relay, where contestants had to slide across the field with lunch trays on their feet.

“My club threw me in for the games, I’m not even dressed for it, but it’s alright. I’m in for whatever happens. This is my first time so of course I’m going for the top spot,” he said.

A water break was given between events due to the temperature, with ASCC providing coolers under tents to ensure that students stayed hydrated.

As the competition continued, students gathered on the edge of the field to watch and wait for their turn, as they were promised that once the event was finished the inflatable maze and obstacle were available for public use from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Peter Bouris, computer science major, was representing the STEM Club and was worried.

“I’m kind of a tall guy, so going through little obstacles isn’t beneficial for me, but I’m just excited to get out, compete and have fun.”

While the clubs did compete with one another, Castillo stated that the Falcon Games were all in the spirit of comradery, as clubs who did not advance after rounds were encouraged to watch the others perform, mingle with one another and of course root for each other and their friends.