Fund nothing, cut everything

Jimmy Edwards-Turner

Summer school is taking another blow at the chopping block this June, and who could honestly be surprised?

The school doesn’t have enough money to continue administering its services efficiently, as well as provide award-winning programs, such as culinary arts.
 
Decisions have to be made about which limb to cut to keep the whole body alive.
 
California has been spending more money on its public services than it has been making in taxes.
 
So, all the wonderful things the state provides us come at the cost of all the people making money here.
 
If only we had more rich people in this state than poor folks, then this problem would be solved.
 
Since it makes no sense whatsoever to tax people with more money higher than those with less, we must obviously get rid of some of these expensive services.
 
Our state-funded education at Cerritos is being hit the hardest, but can’t the state cut its beneficence from somewhere else?
 
Other sectors that could be cut from are any of the hundreds of other schools, from the prison system, transportation or the housing market.
 
Maybe group prison funding with education’s and turn every correctional facility into an educational institution.
 
Convicts can be contracted to perform labor in campus construction or provide security since they are the epitome of cheap muscle.
 
Prisoners and students would then receive all the same benefits and services.
 
That could prove to be disadvantageous though, since all prison staff would have to be paid teachers’ wages.
 
Perhaps getting rid of correctional facilities altogether would prove to be more efficient.
 
The state could draft all convicted criminals and ship them off to whatever country we’re currently occupying.
 
Most inmates already have combat experience and the money we save by cutting the prison system can pay for education and the military twofold.
 
The only qualm with that scenario is the convicted veterans coming back from active duty and receiving priority enrollment here at school.
 
The real estate and housing market are doing so poorly that it would be dangerous to let them run amok in our economy.
 
Let’s get rid of them altogether and include dormitories within every school from junior high to graduate level.
 
Now any citizen seeking education doesn’t have to worry about the cost of moving.
 
Additionally, a rise in revenue from the hotel industry would bolster the state’s economy.
 
The only foreseeable problem there would be the overwhelming influx of daycare centers around universities and even high schools.
 
Parents pursuing their education need someone to take care of their children while they’re in class.
 
Honestly, the money problems our state has extend further than summer school.
 
So, how do we spend efficiently without sacrificing the well-being of our people?

The most unexpected solution could be to forsake the monetary system wholly and replace the legal tender we exchange for goods and services.

The bartering method worked well for a few centuries– maybe a comeback is in order.