‘The Whexican’ film screens in LA

Back to Article
Back to Article

‘The Whexican’ film screens in LA

Advertisement

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






“The Whexican,” a short comedy film directed by Cerritos College acting professor, Forrest Hartl, screened at El Cid restaurant in Los Angeles on Wednesday, Sept. 3.

Tickets were sold only for an audience of 21 and over, at $8, and the starting time was at 8 p.m. However, the first hour of the event was for the filmmakers and audience to enjoy dinner and set up for the show; the theatrical event began until 9 p.m.

The eight-minute short film starred Hartl as Gorman and Alejandro Patino, a Cerritos College alumni, as his estranged Mexican grandfather.

The film’s storyline was inspired by Hartl’s relationship with his grandfather after college.

The film began with Gorman giving his grandfather errands after losing his driver’s license, and becomes closer after he learns more about his Mexican roots.

After learning more about the struggles his grandfather overcame, such as having multiple jobs to support his family, Hartl has grown deeper appreciation for what he has today.

The restaurant was filled with friends and supporters, and a huge turnout from Cerritos College alumni and students.

Chloe Avila, psychology and theater arts major and former student of Hartl, said, “It’s an exciting feeling watching someone who has mentored you for the past four years do something amazing of (his) own.”

“I continuously laughed at Hartl’s facial expressions in the film, as some of them are what he makes off-screen,” Avila said.

Hartl said, “In the 18 months since I’ve made this film, there has been a lot of waiting for responses from festivals.”

The cast and crew for the film consisted of almost entirely Cerritos College alumni: James Mills (Cinematographer), Frank Ledezma (Assistant Director), Sean Zilke (Sound) and Priscilla Daza (Script Supervisor).

Hartl said, “It was overwhelmingly satisfying to hear a packed restaurant laughing and enjoying the film. It’s been my goal all along to get as many as people as possible to see this film.”

Both Patino and Hartl worked on the script a few times until it became better and better; their masterpiece was completed in three days in the spring of 2013.

“It’s fulfilling to tell a story that can be specifically about my grandfather, yet still hold some meaning for other people,” Hartl said.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email