Ratings or Content?

Arielle Martinez

Why do Hollywood interviewers ask irrelevant questions to the stars promoting their film?

Film is an industry built upon the fantasy aspect of entertainment.

It’s an escape to sit down, enjoy a two-hour film with an eight dollar bucket of overpriced popcorn.

It’s an experience we love to enthrall ourselves into a cold dark theater especially on these summer days.

In some cases, it correlates into them winning an Oscar on how they can drastically change their shape to fit a character’s mold. Becoming the character is crucial to their job title, so why isn’t it a reporters job title to treat the people they are interviewing as a fellow colleague? They are both employed in the entertainment industry, receive media coverage/screen time and are paid outrageously large sums.

Actors and interviewers In many instances, go through the same training. Learning a new language, being constricted to a narrow diet, working with limited contracts and lots of publicity to help promote their film/show. Their job is providing an image to the public, it’s quite superficial, but it’s a job.

We treat these stars of our favorite films and shows as if they are objects and somehow above us with higher pay grades. Which is true, actors are just doing their job, so why is it relevant to ask how an actor bulked up or how a woman lost weight to fit into a skin tight costume?

Whether the advertisement is a positive or a negative, it most often can be seen in a not so flattering light.

As new films and television series come into their fall release, more interviews are being done, but are reporters asking the right questions in interviews?

Women are often asked if they are seeing someone or have any work being done.

An interview conducted with Cara Delevingne for the film she starred in, “Paper Towns,” had gone sour after an anchor on Good Day Sacramento asked if she had read the book in it’s entirety?

Anchors kept hurling questions straying from her from promoting her film, mispronounced her name as Carla and insulted her instead saying, “We’ll let you go take a little nap, maybe get a redbull, how bout that?”

Off the air with the actress the anchors began to slander the supermodel/actress saying “She was in a MOOD!”

One question in relevance to the film was, “Do you have any similarities with your character?”

That was the only question asked about the film. In fact these anchors aren’t asking bad questions like if she wears underwear underneath her costume, the anchors just asked groundless questions that weren’t worth anyone’s time to view.

Men are often asked what’s their favorite sports team or what their workout regime consists of. Seems a lot simpler as to whether a person is being asked if they are pregnant, what their current relationship status is and if they are just in a mood.

More often than not they are asking these questions in accordance to their gender, assumptions upon the person and not in relevance to their character portrayed in their work.

Interviewers are balancing on very thin sheet of ice when employed on televised networks.

Ratings can be a focal point with certain questions they have to appeal to certain viewers.

So maybe asking vague general questions is easier than asking actual questions?

Actual questions being “How does your character develop throughout the film/series as opposed to who’s your favorite designer?”

If we weren’t in the age of Kardashians maybe we wouldn’t be so personal toward celebrities? With the entertainment industries varying levels of the word “reporter” maybe this should be a question.

Is it really all about revenue for ratings or is the content not applicable to the products they continue to try and sell? Food for thought.