Women are not objects for your brand

Tisha Lenon, Staff Writer

A campaign is using a new hashtag called #WomenNotObjects to promote the need to stop objectifying women when it comes to advertising products and companies.

The YouTube post, “We Are #WomenNotObjects” has received approximately 1, 075, 821 views and demonstrates to its viewers that you can find many advertisements that objectify women just by googling it.

For example, Burger King’s ad for the BK Super Seven Incher, shows a woman with her mouth open, a sandwich in front of her and in big letters it states, “It’ll blow your mind away”, hinting that the woman is going to give the sandwich a blow job.

Even though women received the right to vote in the 1920’s, they still have to deal with inequality and sexism every day that they see on TV, billboards and social media.

The video shows many businesses using women’s bodies to sell their product.

Some of these major companies include Tom Ford, Marc Jacobs and American Apparel.

These big companies are showing a bad example to people that are trying to start a small business.

Big companies that use sexist advertisements are showing smaller businesses that in order to get people’s attention, or make their product sell, they need to show a woman’s butt or chest in an image of their product.

Instagram is a social media outlet that allows these companies to exploit women and degrade a women’s body, but to a certain extent.

If a plus-sized woman wanted to show her body off, like women do for an advertisement, her picture would be blocked and flagged as inappropriate because of her body type.

Social media has become a part of the next generation’s way of life and these companies and advertisements are showing young women that they must objectify their body, in order to appeal to the world.

Additionally, in doing so, it teaches boys and men that it is okay to objectify women, to be sexist and not care how women are treated.

These types of ads, used, objectify women while simultaneously offending working women, and mothers.

According to this Times article, Madonna Badger, an advertising executive, created ads, like the Calvin Klein campaigns with Mark Wahlberg and Kate Moss, and as well as many others that objectified women.

Now she has decided to no longer make ads that use women as objects and instead urges advertisers to follow this campaign.

After losing her three daughters in a fire, Badger realized that these ads are not safe for younger girls to see and is trying to raise awareness to stop sexist advertising.

Living in a male dominated society it would take some time to get #WomenNotObjects campaign across, but it’s important to start somewhere and to get the message across – to stop objectifying women.

Women are not objects, they are human beings that want equality and respect.