Cerritos College • Norwalk, Calif.

Talon Marks

Cerritos College • Norwalk, Calif.

Talon Marks

Cerritos College • Norwalk, Calif.

Talon Marks

Football players aren’t protected enough

Connie Garcia

Football players are most certainly not protected enough in gear during their games.

There has been an almost direct link between head trauma and/or injuries, and the violent sport. This can only mean that the players are definitely lacking protection in their gear.

In an article written by Cork Gaines for the Business Insider, statistics were given which state that “34 of 35 (97%) brains from former professional football players suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy.”

CTE is a progressive degenerative disease, diagnosed in individuals with a history of multiple concussions and other forms of head injury

One would think that with so many blows to the head while playing football, it would make sense that the helmets the players wear are not doing their job properly.

That same article also stated that an alarming number of NFL (professional football) brains have signs of degenerative brain disease.

The gear professional athletes wear and the gear any other football team wears don’t differ greatly, if at all.

This means that Cerritos College football players are just in as much risk of being diagnosed with this disease if they have been playing for a long period of time, say, since middle school.

Students should be educated about this, but particularly, football players of course.

Wouldn’t you want to know if the sport you’re so fond of or have been playing for so long may be setting you up for brain trauma years from now?

If these players know in detail about the health risks involved, then they are playing at their own risk.

Perhaps the helmets used in play should be further tested in order to ensure maximum protection, or they should be inspected to see if anything can be done to reduce the force of impact of the helmet against the cranium upon each tackle.

One way or another, football players are not 100 percent safe out in the field, but further testing and/or manufacturing could well be a small step toward a big and successful safety result.

Football players aren’t protected enough

Connie Garcia

Football players are most certainly not protected enough in gear during their games.

There has been an almost direct link between head trauma and/or injuries, and the violent sport. This can only mean that the players are definitely lacking protection in their gear.

In an article written by Cork Gaines for the Business Insider, statistics were given which state that “34 of 35 (97%) brains from former professional football players suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy.”

CTE is a progressive degenerative disease, diagnosed in individuals with a history of multiple concussions and other forms of head injury

One would think that with so many blows to the head while playing football, it would make sense that the helmets the players wear are not doing their job properly.

That same article also stated that an alarming number of NFL (professional football) brains have signs of degenerative brain disease.

The gear professional athletes wear and the gear any other football team wears don’t differ greatly, if at all.

This means that Cerritos College football players are just in as much risk of being diagnosed with this disease if they have been playing for a long period of time, say, since middle school.

Students should be educated about this, but particularly, football players of course.

Wouldn’t you want to know if the sport you’re so fond of or have been playing for so long may be setting you up for brain trauma years from now?

If these players know in detail about the health risks involved, then they are playing at their own risk.

Perhaps the helmets used in play should be further tested in order to ensure maximum protection, or they should be inspected to see if anything can be done to reduce the force of impact of the helmet against the cranium upon each tackle.

One way or another, football players are not 100 percent safe out in the field, but further testing and/or manufacturing could well be a small step toward a big and successful safety result.

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Football players aren’t protected enough

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