Talon Marks

Corporations must stop exploiting aspects of Wicca

Bianca Martinez, Editor-in-Chief

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With Sephora and Pinrose’s unsuccessful attempt at commercializing a religion for profit, it brings up the question, should religions be open game to be monetized?

The answer is no if the ones seeking to profit are corporations or are attempting to take advantage of those who practice the religion that is being exploited.

Wicca, which was the religion the Sephora and Pinrose collaboration tried to exploit until it received so much backlash that the companies stopped production, is an example of a religion constantly being monetized.

Some alternative clothing companies have even marketed their apparel as witch wear or appealing to the “witchy” aesthetic.

It is argued that Wicca is not truly a religion, but more of an aesthetic, however, if you were to compare it to other practices that are considered to be part of a religion, such as praying to and worshiping a god or gods, practicing spirituality and living by ideals expressed by teachings connected to a faith, Wicca has all of those aspects of a religion.

However, because the practice has been so widely exploited and stereotyped, Wicca has been are received negatively and therefore striped of the ability to be recognized as a religion.

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Some can also argue that there are practicing Wiccans that sell items connected with the religion and charge for services such as Tarot reading, candle dressing and spell crafting, which should be considered as profiting from religion.

Well, if those who want to use the selling of a religious item as a point of argument, then why aren’t those same people getting mad at those who sell bibles, crucifixes and rosaries?

In actuality, there are Wiccans who do not charge for their ability to Tarot read or for goods such as candles, however, most do because it is considered a service, and it has been universally established that one pays for services rendered.

Most Wiccans aren’t concerned with greed, however, “money makes the world goes round” and we all have to make our money somehow.

Wiccans offer services with the intention to help those who sought out their abilities, corporations sell items related to Wicca to make money, not because they care about the needs or welfare of the consumer.

 

 

 

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Cerritos College • Norwalk, Calif.
Corporations must stop exploiting aspects of Wicca