Cerritos College brings awareness to domestic violence in October

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Purple ribbon on white background, top view. Symbol of Domestic Violence Awareness Photo credit: Copyright: Belchonock/@123RF.com

Robert Yeutter, Opinion Editor

Cerritos College is bringing attention to the important issue of domestic violence/abuse this October.

According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, 10 million adults a year experience domestic violence.

Domestic violence is defined as a pattern of behavior in any relationship that is used to gain or maintain power and control over an intimate partner. This abuse can be physical, sexual, emotional, economical, or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence a person.

Intimate partner violence is most common against women between the ages of 18-24 and accounts for 20% of all violent crime.

Domestic Violence Awareness Infographic showing how many men and women have experienced domestic violence and information about homicides within this violence.
Infographic showing just some of the statistics on domestic violence. Photo credit: Robert Yeutter

According to the Clery Daily Crime Logs for Cerritos College, there have been three cases of domestic violence reported to the Campus police in the last five years.

Cerritos College Chief of Police, Don Mueller, explained that for a campus call to be considered a domestic violence/abuse call, the parties involved are in a current or previous relationship.

For those seeking to leave an abusive relationship, Mueller recommends talking to someone.

“Someone who is in a relationship that is looking to leave, I first suggest that they seek out help,” Mueller said, “we have a victims advocate here on the campus who is here all week long and is confidential. They can talk to us, but they do not have to.”

Mueller recommends victims of domestic violence see the college victim’s advocate, Angel Grey.

Sometimes, victims of domestic abuse do not even realize they are being abused. A college student from Artesia said that it took them a long time to realize that they were a victim. “He used to bring me flowers almost every day and tell me nice things or romantic things.”

The student went on to say that as time was added to the relationship, the person they were with made them feel guilty for things beyond their control and they developed a fear of not making their partner happy.

The student also recommended seeking help even though it can take time, but to go at your pace and when you feel ready. Help can be through someone you trust.

Cerritos College’s goal is to provide education, support and prevention services to students, employees and community members facing domestic violence.

Cerritos is hosting workshops, classes, and a drive to get much needed clothing for in-need students.

The classes range from empowerment self-defense classes, which if missed, will be uploaded onto the college, to presentations on cyberstalking, image-based abuse, and a discussion on human trafficking.

For more information on the remaining courses during the month, visit the Cerritos College Title IX site.

Falcon Safe partnered with Falcon’s Nest to host the donation drive and there are boxes that are placed for donations of clothing items. The most requested item is new, in original packaging undergarments.

Donation box for domestic violence awareness month.
One of several donation boxes located throughout campus. During domestic violence awareness month, these boxes will collect donations for students in need. October 13th, 2021. Photo credit: Robert Yeutter

The college police also provide free escorts to your vehicle or public transportation.

According to Police Chief Mueller, “Very easy. Call over to front dispatch and we will send someone over to make sure they get to their transportation or wherever they are going.”

Chief Mueller ended by saying, “Cerritos College, we should be family members to each other, we should be taking care of each other, they need to know we’re going to be there for them and that we have their back and they don’t have to go it alone.”