Christopher Anthony Velasco brings his art to life

Christopher+Anthony+Velasco%27s+performance+of+%22Window+Dressing%22+is+held+at+the+Fine+Arts+building.+Viewers+can+see+photographs+in+the+performance+on+Sept.+11%2C+2021.+

Gustavo Olivares

Christopher Anthony Velasco’s performance of “Window Dressing” is held at the Fine Arts building. Viewers can see photographs in the performance on Sept. 11, 2021.

Gustavo Olivares, Community Editor

Photographer and performance artist Christopher Anthony Velasco features the human body as art in an amazing performance, in the performance window dressing exhibit on campus, creating an abstract operation room.

He conducted surgery on himself with art mediums that incorporate elements of horror and soft gore.

Velasco’s presence was intimidating as he wore blood-covered scrubs and lab coat, with bright botches of red scattered over their entire body head to toe. The costume was appropriate, as a mad scientist, we see the level of commitment Velasco undergoes as a performance artist, ensuring that the horror genre is present when performing.

Polaroid images of various shapes and sizes capture stages of decay, and the image itself is decomposed which leaves room for interpretation.

At times, it resembled human flesh tones or advanced stages of infectious diseases that evoke fears with anyone aware of their own mortality.

Photo-sensitive polaroid’s that deteriorated over the course of the performance. Leaving room for interpretation, they resembled medical photographs or other bodily tones of color.
Christopher Anthony Velasco’s Photo-sensitive polaroids deteriorated over the course of the performance. Leaving room for interpretation, they resembled medical photographs or other bodily tones of color during the performance on Sept. 11, 2021. Photo credit: Gustavo Olivares

Manipulations of photo-sensitive polaroid’s allowed Velasco to play the role as a doctor.

Operating with violent attacks on stage and on themselves, he pushed the boundaries of personal expression by merging photographs of the environment onto himself with cropping, cutting and pasting.

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the performance required social distancing outside. Attendees had to wear facemask in order to watch the performance and ensure the safety of other people

The novelty of this experience was made possible due to the limitations of what performance artists can perform while maintaining the safety of others. Themes of natural decay and decomposition were subtle in the performance but greatly used as visual metaphors for Velasco.

Replicating what the audience saw for both performances gave Velasco’s show an underground feeling.

You had to be there, just like how Polaroid’s reflect a moment and eventually fade away.