Sex sells, but not when it comes to rape

It is said in journalism and other forms of news that sex sells, and more often then not, it is true. A story about a scandalous affair more likely to get attention than your average news report. Cases about rape are, of course, no exception.

When a woman is raped people often mock her, or joke about the act. People accuse the victim of dressing or acting in a way that gathers unwanted attention. I common statement is even that “she deserved it.” To be clear, no one deserves to be raped for any reason.

On March 13, 1964 Kitty Genovese was walking her to her apartment complex when she was mugged, stabbed, and raped. Members of the apartment were reported to have heard and possibly seen the attack but a call of help was not answered until after.

That was 40 years ago but still stands today society has become numb to the word and the act of rape. Yet at the same time we have seemingly glorified sex.

Take the story of Audrie Pott for example. A California teen who was drinking, at the age of 15 mind you, at a party and passed out. Two teens from her school allegedly raped her while she was unconscious and took photos of her nude.

Audrie couldn’t take the embarrassment and shame as the photos spread across her school. She felt her life was over, and committed suicide last September.It wasn’t until recently that the trial started and gained attention.

Perhaps it is the glorification of sex that has caused such a disassociation with this horrible act.

Films show the hero saving the day and sleeping with the girl as a reward while music puts a tune to it. Television soap operas, of course, are full of characters falling for each other left and right.

With these constant reminders that sex is what the good guy gets, it is no wonder that when we come across rape cases, we see the as a triumph in the battle of the sexes.

We repeal away from the idea of rape because of this. Rape shouldn’t exist in our society, so we turn a blind eye to it. This discourages victims from speaking out about the circumstances of their attack.

Male rape is treated like a punchline to very bad joke in that people laugh at the concept of it. “Oh men can’t get raped. No that’s ridiculous you probably enjoyed it.”

It was no joke to the 17 men who were sexually assaulted and raped in Zimbabwe in 2011. Drugged by three woman, the men were unconscious and no way able to give consent.

We need to start treating these cases with a sensitive but firm opposition. Accusations need to be investigated and examined so innocent men and woman aren’t accused, and victims don’t go unheard.