Spoilers: ‘Halloween Ends,’ all hope for the franchise

Halloween+Ends+poster

Universal Studios

This is the “Halloween Ends” poster, which is releasing on Oct. 14 in theaters and on Peacock.

Gabriel Villegas, Staff Writer

David Gordon Green’s “Halloween Ends” was released on Oct. 14 and officially closes the sequel trilogy which retconned all past projects and continued 40 years after the events of the original 1978 film.

“Halloween Ends” grossed $41 million during its opening weekend, yet still fell behind its predecessor “Halloween Kills,” which made $49.4 million in its opening weekend.

Despite its successful opening, Green’s finale received many mixed reviews, largely being negative.

The film succeeds in its cinematography, ever so reminiscent of the original “Halloween,” as well as its strong leads and standout performances, especially in its kills.

Where the film begins to dip is in the continuation of the egregious commentary on evil itself.

Like the first two, “Halloween Ends” attempts to explore what makes a person evil, this time with an Audience Surrogate in fresh face Rohan Campbell’s character Cory Cuningham who, minor spoilers, becomes the lead antagonist.

This may surprise viewers as the trailers teased the final fight between Laurie Strode, played by Jamie Lee Curtis and The Shape, played by James Jude Courtney.

Opening on Campbell’s Cory, who performs excellently in the film, we see him accidentally kill the child he is babysitting after being locked in a dark room in which he attempts to aggressively break the door down.

It’s the guilt and judgment from this that ultimately lead Cory to become the main antagonist of the film, as well as his interactions with returning actress Andi Matichak playing Allyson, who’s the lead protagonist.

In fact, Laurie and Michael are sidelined for a story that focuses on how everyone else has become impacted by their rivalry.

Three years after Cory’s accident and four years since “Halloween” and “Halloween Kills,” events, there were radio broadcasts; flashbacks and narration from Laurie reveal Haddonfield has turned savage in its period of mourning.

The film explores its characters’ grief well as each character is tense from constant torment by Haddonfield’s bitter residents, but it’s with the townspeople that “Halloween Ends” loses its brilliance and becomes ridiculous.

Cory is persistently harassed by a cartoonish group of marching band members who always know where he is, always wears the same thing and drive in a convertible sports car.

Laurie’s blamed for Michael’s rampage by survivors, despite Dr. Sartain freeing Michael in “Halloween” and it is revealed Michael has no personal vendetta against Laurie in “Halloween Kills.”

As the lead characters share their grief, Laurie begins to suspect Cory of having a more sinister agenda as he eventually encounters Michael and becomes his disciple.

As Michael and Cory begin killing and The Shape resurges, the carnage ensues!

“Halloween Ends” can be seen in theaters and on Peacock with a premium subscription.