Rose Buds Radio: 420 appreciation

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Rebecca Aguila

"Rose Buds" is a cannabis-friendly column intended for readers 21 years and older. We encourage only legal and responsible enjoyment of all cannabis products.

Kianna Znika and Rebecca Aguila

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KIANNA: All right, cool. So welcome to another segment of Rosebuds Radio. I’m Kianna.

REBECCA: and I am Rebecca.

KIANNA: Keeping the 420 spirit alive and well during this nationwide lockdown.

REBECCA: So in efforts to keep this 420 vibe going we will be doing a weekly written column and a podcast giving you every update you need and for those who are looking to dabble in cannabis during this quarantine lockdown.

KIANNA: Yes, so, it’s April 22nd. We hope everyone had a great 420 and if you could just let us know in the comments how you spent your 420 you might have a chance to be featured in one of our next columns.

KIANNA: So going back to the pandemic, since the coronavirus pandemic started, a lot of festivals have been cancelled not only Coachella but cannabis-based festivals as well. So this highly affects cannabis brands from selling wholesale items.

REBECCA: So yeah, one of the most popular festivals that recently had to reschedule was Kushstock Festival and this is basically like the big poppa of all Cannabis Cup festivals and is actually a chance for you to buy a VIP ticket and to be an actual judge during these, during these festivals. So it’s right now it kind of sucks for all of the brands and the vendors.

REBECCA: All of them prep for this and not and now they’re not able to have a chance to do their giveaways or their wholesale items. So it kind of sucks for that community right now.

KIANNA: Yeah, but it does make you think too, like how there’s a lot of different artists that are kind of going live on Instagram. I wonder what your opinion would be on like a Kushstock Festival quote-on-quote via like Zoom because there was another more local-based festival that I knew of called Tent Festival and it was going to take place on 420 as well.

KIANNA: But since, you know, the in-person event got canceled, they moved it all to a virtual Zoom meeting.

REBECCA: Which those can be really fun because I mean you get a chance of to just like kind of smoke by yourself and see all these artists by yourself and not in a in a crowd where it’s hot usually and you know, there’s just like people that are not the greatest. So that’s a little con, I mean a pro of it not a con, my bad.

REBECCA: But what really affects me for these festivals is the fact that little local vendors were able to sell their things. And since this festival is particulatly located in the middle of nowhere in Adelanto, which is near Victorville for all those people who are not very, what is it, are known for California.

REBECCA: So this is like the bad time for all those small businesses who had a chance to sell all of their arts and crafts at Kushstock Festival. So it’s not the best time for them right now.

KIANNA: Man, so what, so you would get artwork. Would they also be selling like cannabis?

REBECCA: I mean, it depends like Kushstock festival’s open to anybody who wants to vend anything but it’s mostly affiliated with cannabis, you know, but you get a chance to see people who crochet, people who make jewelry, people who sell incense, stuff like that.

REBECCA: Kind of like a vibe, you know like reggae and and you know, you know the typical cannabis stuff you’ll find around, you know incense to cover the mask of the smell of cannabis in your room. So little stuff like that are usually very popular at events like this.

KIANNA: Yeah, so especially during these times, you know, there’s lots of talk of supporting small businesses. So this could kind of join the argument, no?

REBECCA: Yes, I think so. I mean these people really depended on the foot traffic and Adelanto doesn’t really have a lot of festivals except for Kushstock. So it’s a huge detriment it to the crowd right now.

KIANNA: And right now I mean there are dispensaries and different brands on Weedmaps, but I don’t necessarily know what it takes for a local vendor, even like a local smoke shop, to be added to something big like Weedmaps, you know. Yeah, I do know that one way to support like local vendors, if you could somehow find a crystal shop that’s open, like a spiritual arts shop because those you know, they allways do have like the stuff for for cannabis. So since they’re still selling all the crystals, different oils and incense, they’re still selling their cannabis related products as well.

REBECCA: So, I mean it’s it kind of sucks that this pandemic is is making all these businesses kind of struggle for them to sell their stuff now so I mean, it kind of bums me out. I mean, I really when I had went to Kushstock, that’s the one I’d seen all these lives local artist that made me feel happy. The fact that they were able to get out there and at least showcase some of their artwork or their knickknacks or whatever they had.

REBECCA: So it sucks right now. So I mean, I’m pretty sure they’re having other ways to keep their businesses open and doing online deliveries and all that. But as for what I know so far that’s it’s a huge huge impact on those small businesses for Kushstock. I mean, it’s it’s usually a free festival so they don’t really get a profit of these, it’s mostly for the people but you know, it kind of sucks.

KIANNA: Yeah, I mean this whole situation sucks, but I guess then so we know it sucks for the local businesses. You, as the person that’s been to one of these festivals before, how do you think that other fans of this festival are feeling? Like are they bummed out as well or is this something that they can enjoy from home too?Iis there any alternative to it?

REBECCA: I personally think the Kushstock Festival has gone down in their quality of festivals because before weed was legal, you know, there was a whole bunch of these giveaways and you know, there wasn’t a high demand of like a safety, in a way. I mean like not safety but like how much consumption you’re taking, so now they’re a lot more regulated and now these events aren’t the best kind.

REBECCA: Like recently there’s not a lot of vendors that go anymore. So it’s kind of like a handful of people that show up but you still get to see a whole bunch of performers, you could see a whole bunch of these people sell food and a bunch of food infusions. There are actually some popular brands that do go to these events, which makes it 10 times better.

REBECCA: So it’s now I feel like people aren’t as disappointed from what it used to be back then when weed was not legal and I feel like people now have just have an easier way of accessing cannabis and anything like that. So it’s not a total bummer, but it is a bummer if you know, you just got into it when you never been to a cannabis Festival, it does suck but you have your own ways of you know, enjoying festivals.

REBECCA: I mean there’s there’s what a whole bunch of virtual concerts now going, so it’s not the end of the world. So hopefully within time these festivals happen again, but they’ll take a little bit more precaution and preparing of a pandemic like this, you know.

KIANNA: And actually, it’s interesting that you brought up that like kind of like the appreciation for these festivals kind of died down when weed was legalized and it almost makes you think what is that just a general thing? Like maybe in general, just appreciation for weed went down once it got legalized?

REBECCA: I think the fact that the stigmatism of it being still lowkey has been a detachment for and now it’s more of an open thing. I think people are are less skeptical of marijuana. So I don’t think the hype is as real like it’s there but it’s not like how it used to be before now, you know.

REBECCA: But I mean, it’s definitely gone down in quality, I would say. A lot of people like to sell their stuff off the black market and a lot of brands are like having to raise up their taxes because you know city taxes are crazy. So I kid you not you’ll be going to dispensaries and paying like $10 in taxes and it’s like what the hell? I mean, that’s what happens when you when you vote for weed to be legalized. So you get what you ask for.

KIANNA: Yeah, I see different signs everywhere, mostly in Long Beach, where it’s this group trying to lower the cannabis tax. Weed tax. I was actually going to go to a meeting for it last semester.
REBECCA: Ah, that would have been a good one. But there’s a lot of people trying to fight it because it’s really, it’s crazy because now a lot of people just don’t even go on Weedmaps anymore. It’s affecting a lot of like the weed businesses who had good Weedmap foot traffic.

REBECCA: So now it’s like people are starting to go back to alternative, to street marijuana or sometimes it’s not the best but you do get better deals and you don’t get tax. But sometimes you don’t even know what you’re getting with street cannabis. It’s better to just go to the dispensaries where it’s lab tested and it’s grown in a facility and it shows you the percentage of the THC and you get all these details and facts about it. I personally would rather go to a dispensary more than you know, trust more than like street cannabis, honestly. It’s much more safer than street cannabis.

KIANNA: Yeah, like even though it’s a lot more expensive it is worth it and like that made me start thinking, you know, that it kind of balances out. So maybe even though the appreciation for weed went down once it was legalized, the fact that it is now sold for its high quality and just a little bit more, a little bit higher in price.

KIANNA: Like, that’s awesome. That makes you then appreciate weed again.

REBECCA: I would hope people would appreciate it more. I mean, I hope people don’t just see it as a way for them to just get taxes, which it does look like because of taxes are so high but the fact that you’re getting a high-quality top cannabis with instructions and, you know, and uses and in like all these, what’s it called, certified stickers, you know.

REBECCA: It’s a plus that’s healthy approved. It’s good for you and you know once you open it, it’s not going to be all like, you know dry and ugly. It’s going to look nice and beautiful and in a super nice package. But I mean you could go so much more deeper into the pros and cons of legalized cannabis. So that’s like a whole other conversation. The pros and cons of legalized cannabis.

KIANNA: Oh, that sounds like a future column or what?

REBECCA: I’m down.I like that.

KIANNA: All right Well that is definitely something to look forward to, readers. We also have our next column coming out will be fun games to play while enjoying some cannabis.

REBECCA: Yeah, we got a couple games for you guys. So please stay tuned to our next segment. But for now, this was the end of our podcast. It’s fairly short, you know, there’s nothing really much going on in the cannabis industry right now but we bid you farewell and thank you for listening to Rose Buds radio. I’m Rebecca

KIANNA: I’m Kianna. Happy 420, Rose Buds.
REBECCA: Happy 420!

 

Music by: Surfaces