Students struggle to check-in & get to class on time

Meximos+Garcia+inspects+the+check-in+questionnaire+from+two+students+on+Monday%2C+Aug.+16%2C+2021.+He+gives+them+a+wristband+to+show+they+have+no+symptoms+of+COVID-19.+Photo+credit%3A+Vincent+Medina

Meximos Garcia inspects the check-in questionnaire from two students on Monday, Aug. 16, 2021. He gives them a wristband to show they have no symptoms of COVID-19. Photo credit: Vincent Medina

Lily Marmolejo and Vincent Medina

Cerritos College is requiring students to check-in at health screening kiosks before going to class. Each student will receive a wristband at the kiosk, after confirming they show no symptoms of COVID-19 or any other illness.

A Cerritos College student receives a wristband from Meximos Garcia at the health screening kiosk on Monday, Aug. 16, 2021. The wristband proves they have no COVID-19 symptoms, and they are safe to enter campus.
A Cerritos College student receives a wristband from Meximos Garcia at the health screening kiosk on August 16, 2021. The wristband proves they have no COVID-19 symptoms, and they are safe to enter campus. Photo credit: Vincent Medina

The college posted the new check-in procedures on the school website and sent an email to inform students of the change on August 13.

However, many students were not aware of the check-in procedures until they were informed by their professors or upon arriving to campus.

“I heard about it through my zoom meeting yesterday. Where do I even go?” said James Talam.

Liaisons directed students to screening sites, where health screeners provided them with maps to each kiosk location on campus.

“We’ve had a lot of students who’ve needed direction to get a wristband,” said college liaison Parker Rivera. “From there they had trouble finding their classes, so we chauffeured them to their room.”

Many students remain confused about the check-in protocol, as there is minimal direction to kiosks on campus.

“So far it has not been a problem because it’s not busy, but [health screening] isn’t necessary,” said Isaiah Soto. “If you feel healthy, and you know they haven’t been exposed you should be able to walk in.”

The check-in procedure consists of scanning a QR code and answering a brief questionnaire.

Meximos Garcia gives a wristband to a student at the library health screening kiosk on Monday, Aug. 16, 2021. The wristband shows that the student is safe to enter campus, and has no COVID-19 symptoms.
Meximos Garcia gives a wristband to a student at the library health screening kiosk on Monday, Aug. 16, 2021. The wristband shows that the student is safe to enter campus, and has no COVID-19 symptoms. Photo credit: Vincent Medina

Students must answer if they have a temperature of 100 degrees Fahrenheit, cough, fatigue, contact with a COVID-19 positive person and if they traveled outside the region during the last 10 days.

Students who are asymptomatic would be able to enter campus and carry the virus onto campus.

Health screeners say more kiosks will be added to campus once more people apply for the job.

Starting September 30, students and faculty will be required to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or provide a weekly negative COVID-19 test.

Students on campus shared different opinions about the upcoming vaccine mandate.

“Masks are still necessary. Mandating the vaccine is the optimal way to do it,” said Talam.

“Masks should be optional. At least we get the option to get tested, vaccines shouldn’t be required,” said Soto. “There are still so many unknowns. People who are more vulnerable to the virus should get it.”