The Envelope: Joining clubs is beneficial to you

Benjamin Garcia

It would be excellent if you joined one of the many clubs and donated to their affiliated causes if you have the resources to spare.

If you attend Cerritos College President Jose Fierro’s President’s Hour you would know that enrollment is down. Perhaps because going to college has diminishing returns.

During a town hall meeting held on Thursday, March 2, ASCC president Saul Lopez said that student involvement with clubs was down.

In a private interview he said that involvement is slowly on the rise again (despite enrollment being down), after all there were apparently “a lot” of clubs participating in the 2017 Falcon Games.

“Nice,” Lopez summarized.

The clubs on campus might be experiencing this new, steady increase in student involvement because the clubs on campus, now more than ever, are aligning themselves with the needs and desires of the modern student.

The clubs on campus show a surplus of awareness by doing charitable acts as part of their curriculum, which many would say is an important addition to the college experience.

As it’s website says, President Franklin Roosevelt’s personal struggle with polio led him to create the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis also known as March for Dimes at a time when polio was on the rise.

Phi Beta Lambda is working in cooperation with March for Dimes, an organization that gives funding to premature birth research and saves lives through small donations from many people.

Another such charitable act was a free suicide prevention certification workshop hosted by Active Minds with guest speaker Becky Fein.

“Changing the conversation about mental health,” which is what Fein said was the objective of Active Minds, has increased importance because of the current political climate facilitated by the Trump regime.

These activities are not just good for the community, they are also good for the individual student.

If you have the time, ability and resources to help others, and helping others for the sake of helping others is not enough of a reward for you, charity can also boost your low self-esteem.

Kim Berling talked to me about her students in the Compassion in Action club, saying that, “[Club members] have said they feel a deep level of personal empowerment,” and better about themselves; because “there is something about helping others that makes them feel like they are worth while.”

What are you waiting for?