Coaches and trainers prepare for athletes return to campus

No.1+leadoff+hitter+Buck+Anderson+amongst+others+are+now+left+to+figure+out+other+ways+to+workout+and+stay+in+shape+due+to+COVID-19.+Photo+credit%3A+nick+martinez

Nick Martinez

No.1 leadoff hitter Buck Anderson amongst others are now left to figure out other ways to workout and stay in shape due to COVID-19. Photo credit: nick martinez

Keanu Ruffo, Sports Editor

The day for athletes to return to campus is still undecided, the coaches and trainers are preparing their return anyway.

Guidelines from the state are being reviewed for athletes, coaches, and training staff to follow if there is to be a return to campus in the following months according to Cerritos college’s Athletic Director, Maria Castro.

“The state has given us guidelines that go to the county. When L.A. county gives us clearance, then it is ultimately up to our administration at Cerritos to approve and allow the re-socialization of our athletic programs,” Castro said.

If the guidelines are approved by the administration board, the safety protocols and procedures will be the same as professional athletes and college athletes follow every day.

Brian Cable, head trainer at Cerritos college, explains what protocols and procedures athletes, coaches, and his own training staff will have to undergo everyday.

“All athletes will check in every day with the online symptom checklist that the school set up, and then do temperature screening when they arrive on campus.

Those with symptoms will not be allowed on campus for the appropriate time period.”

All athletes who pass the protocols will do conditioning in small groups while keeping social distancing according to the guidelines produced by the state.

“Any athlete with symptoms will be referred to the county resources for follow up care,” Cable said.

If athletes are granted access to return to workouts and practice, there will be restricted areas athletes will not be allowed to pass through or socialize in.

“Athletes will follow a re-socialization plan that will be strictly followed, if and when we are allowed. It will show entry and exit points and facilities will be limited to what is safe for participation,” Castro said.

As far as the training staff goes, they have to prepare for a return even if athletes are denied access back to campus.

“All of our staff has gone through some online training in the recognition of COVID-19 related symptoms. We will be using an appointment system for our athletes to receive treatment and rehab for their injuries,” Cable explained.

Cable went on to explain the purpose of the appointment system which will allow his staff to keep patients limited in the amount of contact they have with other athletes.

Cable and his staff will use more electronic forms of communication such as Zoom, emails, texts, and telemedicine to contact and keep up with updates from injured or infected players.

The appointment system will be very useful and relied on as coronavirus testing will not take place on campus for athletes and coaches.

Trainers will encourage athletes and coaches to get tested for COVID-19 at a free testing site provided by the county.

“We are fortunate that our college understands our concerns and have been supportive of giving us flexibility in adjusting our staffing needs,” Cable said.

The process for Castro to get athletes back on campus has been long and patient, but the importance of safety is something she cares about most.

“The safety of our student population is of utmost importance and we will work together to make our return to campus as successful as possible.”